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Saturday 2 July 2022
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CETL Reflections, Tips, and Quotes

Jul 2022

CETL Reflection of the Week – Cheating

Link to the page Cheating
Cheating is posing a serious threat to the quality of higher education. There are no simple solutions to the problem of cheating. By adopting a multi-pronged approach that balances both the positive and educative nature of academic integrity with the adversarial and punitive nature of assessment security, we can potentially address the problem of cheating.
Academic integrity involves:
  1. Upholding fundamental values of academic integrity such as trust, and respect;
  2. Equipping students with the capabilities and building a culture of integrity;
  3. Creating policies, and pedagogies that uphold academic integrity.
Assessment security involves:
  1. Adopting approaches to detect attempts to cheat;
  2. Taking measures to make cheating more difficult;
  3. Enforcing assessment security measures such as authentication and detection to block e-cheating sites.
Reference:
Dawson, P. (2020). Defending assessment security in a digital world: preventing e-cheating and supporting academic integrity in higher education. Routledge.https://www.routledge.com/Defending-Assessment-Security-in-a-Digital-World-Preventing-E-Cheating/Dawson/p/book/9780367341527.

Posting date:  02- Jul-2022

Jun 2022

CETL Tips of the Week – Accessibility arrangement during course preparation

Link to the page
How to foster the communication with students about their accessibility needs during course preparation? This week’s tips are drawn from the Guideline on fostering practices for disability inclusion at higher education institutions developed by Dr. Patcy Yeung from the Faculty of Education and her team of the teaching development project on enhancing learning experience for students with visual impairment in higher education. We may refer to Chapter 14.3 of the Guideline for details.
  1. Make effective use of course outlines
    Course outlines facilitate students to identify potential barriers and required accessibility services early on so that timely arrangements can be made.
  2. Encourage students to express their needs
    Invite students to voice out their needs in the welcoming email before the class starts and/or by making public announcement on the first day of class.
  3. Work with students
    Discuss with students about their accessibility needs. Work out potential solutions with students and keep them informed of the accessibility arrangement progress.
  4. Protect students’ privacy and confidentiality
    When in doubt about how to assist the students, ask them as privately as possible. Do not spotlight particular students to the rest of the class without students’ consent.
  5. Allow time for accessibility arrangement
    Provide students with the learning materials for the coming class as early as possible. Give advance notice if there will be changes in the topics and/or activities and provide suggested preparation.
Reference:
Ma, G. Y. K., Chan, B. L. F., Wu, F. K. Y., Ng, S. T. M., Ip, E. C. L., & Yeung, P. P. S. (2021). Enhancing Learning Experience for Students with Visual Impairment in Higher Education. Guideline on fostering practices for disability inclusion at higher education institutions. (Trial ed.). The University of Hong Kong. (146 pages.). https://doi.org/10.25442/hku.17032685.v1.

Posting date:  24-Jun-2022

CETL Tips of the Week – Disability inclusion in teaching

Link to the page
How can we promote disability inclusion in our teaching? This week’s tips are drawn from the Guideline on fostering practices for disability inclusion at higher education institutions developed by Dr. Patcy Yeung from the Faculty of Education and her team of the teaching development project on enhancing learning experience for students with visual impairment in higher education. We may refer to the corresponding chapters of the Guideline for details.
  1. Understand, respect, and cater for diverse learning needs of students
    Adopt Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles in teaching to cater for diverse learning needs of students (Chapter 2.6)
  2. Consider the accessibility of the teaching space
    Prepare for flexibility in teaching modes and in-class activities and support in response to the accessibility of the teaching space (both physical and virtual). (Chapters 5.1, 14.3, and 14.10)
  3. Create accessible teaching materials
    Apply web and multimedia accessibility guidelines in designing electronic teaching materials and communicating with students. (Chapter 5.4)
  4. Be mindful of disability representation in teaching materials
    Incorporate disability and accessibility elements that better reflect the inherent diversity in society in teaching materials and activities. (Chapters 6.4 and 7.8)
  5. Practice effective and inclusive communication
    Adopt bias-free wording, and empathetic, patient, and inclusive way of communicating. (Chapters 5.5 and 7)
Reference:
Ma, G. Y. K., Chan, B. L. F., Wu, F. K. Y., Ng, S. T. M., Ip, E. C. L., & Yeung, P. P. S. (2021). Enhancing Learning Experience for Students with Visual Impairment in Higher Education. Guideline on fostering practices for disability inclusion at higher education institutions. (Trial ed.). The University of Hong Kong. (146 pages.). https://doi.org/10.25442/hku.17032685.v1.

Posting date:  17-Jun-2022

CETL Quote of the Week – Ms. Lidia V. Ratoi

Link to the page
It became natural that studio is treated as a research laboratory, introducing students the multitude of methods of designing, in order to ensure that their knowledge and design methodology coincide with the worldwide trends.
Learning is a primordial gesture, and as teachers we bear the responsibility of instilling passion and nurturing the curiosity of students.
 
Ms. Lidia V. Ratoi
Assistant Lecturer
Department of Architecture
Faculty of Architecture
Early Career Teaching Award 2021

Posting date:  10-Jun-2022

CETL Quote of the Week – Dr. Peter J. Cobb

Link to the page
My teaching philosophy is encapsulated in the three words: Engagement, Accessibility, and Innovation. For students to learn, they first must feel a strong connection to the subject.
 
Dr. Peter J. Cobb
Assistant Professor
Faculties of Education and Arts
Early Career Teaching Award 2021

Posting date:  02-Jun-2022

May 2022

CETL Quote of the Week – Ms. Promail K.Y. Leung

Link to the page
I used my CURI teaching framework to promote students’ CURIosity in learning science: (i) infuse Challenging and Interesting tasks in teaching; and ii) illustrate the Relevance and Usefulness of concepts in students’ lives.
 
Ms. Promail K.Y. Leung
Senior Lecturer
Faculty of Education
Early Career Teaching Award 2021

Posting date:  26-May-2022